Thursday, December 26, 2013

Ding dong!


If you had presented the following list to me, I could not have told you what they refer to. 
I hope you are better informed than I.

LARI MANAT DRAM TENGE SUM

If you are still puzzled (no googling, mind), maybe the following additions will help you:

TUGRIK TOLAR LAY KUNA LITAS

 A Happy New Year to you. May the best thing that happened to you in 2013 be the worst thing that happens to you in 2014.

6 comments:

Mike and Ann said...

Household Gods? No, that's Lares et Penates (if memory serves - and I think it does in this case).

No, Don't know.

Jake Allsop said...

Would it help if I added LEI and FORINT?

Mike and Ann said...

Doesn't seem to have done. LEI is, I think, a garland used in the South Sea Islands, whereas FORINT, in East Anglia is used to indicate someone who lives outside your own village. No, sorry; no further forrard, I'm afraid.

Jake Allsop said...

No reason why you should know these, Mike, and a lot of them were new to me too. Sadly a lot of sister words of this kind have disappeared with the introduction of the euro: lovely words like zloty, koruna and peseta. Damn progress!

Jake Allsop said...

btw, LEI is the plural form of LEU, the former currency of Romania. You are right, though, that a lei is a garland of flowers. On my first day in Thailand, years back, one was put round my neck, and I kept it on during a whole day of lecturing to a class of diminutive Thai beauties. I looked quite pretty too for once!

Mike and Ann said...

Well done Jake! I got totally hung up on it as a sentence of some sort. Should have worked it out, specially from the 'Tolar' which I take it is a form of the old 'taler'. I suppose they are both related to the 'dollar'. Bring back guineas and crowns and ha'pence, say I. Knew just where you were with those.